Author’s Advice: Have Faith in Yourself

SHADOW OF ATLANTIS_front onlyYes, we CAN travel back in time…with books. Today Wendy Leighton-Porter, author of the Shadows of the Past time-travel novels, talks about a few of her sixteen time-travel adventures, and more. I hope you’ll enjoy getting to know this interesting woman who spends her time writing and enjoying life in the United Kingdom and southern France. 

Wendy, my first question – what inspired you to write your Shadows from the Past series of time-travel novels?

My mother had always told me I should write a book. However, with a full-time teaching job, complete with lessons to plan, books to mark, exams to correct and reports to write in the evenings and on weekends, I never quite found enough time. When I gave up my teaching career, I found I no longer had an excuse. But what would I write? For some unknown reason, I had a sudden epiphany whilst on a flight from the UK to France. The idea for my “Shadows from the Past” series just popped into my head, almost fully-formed. I couldn’t wait to get started and, as soon as I was able to sit down at my computer, I found the first story just flowed out of me! [Read more…]

Riding Invisible – Book Review

Riding Invisible
It’s been awhile since a book review, and since I found this particular book so interesting, I wanted to share “Riding Invisible” by Sandra Alonzo with you.

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I loved “Riding Invisible” and had a hard time putting it down. The story begins with young Yancy running away from home on his horse, Shy, and the journal of his adventure. [Read more…]

“Everyone Has Talents and Abilities” – DelSheree Gladden

A double-header today! I’m pleased to bring you talented author DelSheree Gladden, and discuss her fifth book, Inquest: Book One of the Destroyer Trilogy (Volume 1). After DelSheree shares her thoughts on writing, character building and story creation, I’ve included a review of Inquest. So, please, take your seats, and enjoy the games.

Game One: The Interview

  1. 1.  What inspired you to choose present day and Albuquerque, New Mexico, as the setting for this novel?

I have lived in New Mexico most of my life. I grew up in a small town with only one stoplight. I have learned to write what I know, but a small town wasn’t the right setting for Inquest. I needed a bigger stage for a teenage girl meant to destroy the world to make her appearance. Albuquerque had the appeal of being a decent sized city, and I felt it was a good match for Libby’s story. [Read more…]

What Do You Look for in a Review?

Today I am part of a group of virtual friends who are answering the question:  What do you look for in a review?  The Reading-Romances blog asked over 40 book reviewers, readers, authors, and book bloggers to share their thoughts on this subject today.  I’m looking forward to seeing the answers from this widely varied group.  Book Reviews blog hop

I blogged about book reviews in February, discussing the mechanics of book reviews and some tips on writing them.  If you are interested in that kind of information, please see “On Book Reviews.”  I wrote that article hoping to encourage people to write reviews – all people – not just book reviewers.  As an author, I greatly value official book reviewers’ [Read more…]

Critiquing Guidelines via Edie Hemingway

I blogged recently about the value of receiving critiques as a writer. I then fortunately received the following guidelines from co-Regional Advisor of the Maryland-Delaware-West Virginia Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators, Edie Hemingway, on giving critiques. Edie graciously agreed to let me share these tips in my blog as a follow-up to my last post.

In Edie’s words, “I put these together when I started teaching my own workshops, based on my experiences ‘workshopping’ during my MFA program at Spalding University. I’ll also be using them for the online course I’m teaching this summer for McDaniel College’s graduate certificate program in Writing for Children and Young Adults.”

Edie Hemingway is the author of Road to Tater Hill
(Delacorte Press and Yearling paperback), winner of a 2009 Parents’ Choice Gold Award, and besides writing, teaches several writing workshops. If you’d like to find out more about her and her programs, she can be reached at
http://www.ediehemingway.com

This is a great list for those who belong to a critique group or plan on joining one. As Edie suggests, these are also useful during the revision process.

[Read more…]

Critiques

Writing critiquesIt’s fascinating how our perspectives can change over time. Last year I attended the regional Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI) Spring Conference and saw people receiving critiques from an agent, an editor, and two published authors. I thought, “What kind of people would want to put theirselves through that?” This year, I completed the first ten pages of my current manuscript and anxiously awaited for a chance to compete for one of the thirty available critique slots. I secured one of those sessions, and now completely understand the value critiques play in the writing process.

Admittedly, I’m having much more trouble with my current book, Believing In Horses, Too, than I did with my first book. When I wrote my first book, Believing In Horses, I sat down and wrote. I hadn’t studied books, followed blogs, attended conferences, or listened to webinars all telling me how to write better. I wrote, and revised, edited, and then fortunately had good editors and an excellent publisher. Somehow I thought all I’ve been learning over the past two years would make this next book easier. But it hasn’t. Knowing all that I’m doing wrong has made it that much harder.

[Read more…]