Thank You, Local Supporters

031315_2304_ThankYouLoc1.jpgI wanted to take a moment and thank some of the wonderful local supporters who have helped me in my writing journey.
I’ll start with Maryland Senator Edward R. Reilly who celebrated the National Education Association’s Read Across America Day by donating copies of my latest book, “Believing In Horses, Too,” to Anne Arundel County Public Schools last week.
Reilly donates books written by local authors to schools in his district annually on Read Across America Day, and this year he recognized me in the Senate Chamber on March 3, and urged support for local authors. Of all the books in the country, he has selected both of mine as donations in the past few years.
Local news outlets including the Bowie Patch, and the Odenton-Severn Patch spread the word about the Read Across America event, as did The Equiery magazine.
I’ve had local educators, librarians, and writers support me over the past few years, including members of the wonderful Accokeek Women Writers Group.

Lucky at the Annapolis Book Festival (photo by Julia Simmons)

Lucky at the Annapolis Book Festival (photo by Julia Simmons)

I could not have asked for better support from the Maryland and Virginia equine communities in help writing “Believing In Horses,” and “Believing In Horses, Too.” What I did not anticipate was the continued support I would receive from Loftmar Stables, Freedom Hill Horse Rescue, Thoroughbred Placement Resources, Inc., the Maryland Horse Council, the Maryland Horse Industry Board, Maryland Therapeutic Riding, Inc., Days End Farm Horse Rescue, Spirit Serving Veterans, and the Caisson Platoon Equine Assisted Programs.
Just last week, I walked into the Crofton Dover Saddlery and saw my books on a special display. I asked the associates if they would like me to sign them, and their interest and enthusiasm made my day.
I definitely can’t leave out my family and friends who have invited me to events, participated in events, and spread the work about my books. My mom, Flo Ormond, has ensured that all her art students know about my work and has supported me every step of the way. My husband, Jaime Navarro, has supported event after event, even dubbing himself my “Public Affairs Officer,” while taking photos and talking to people. He even brought our horse, Lucky, to the Annapolis Book Festival to meet readers!
I know how lucky I am to have the support I do, and I don’t think I say thank you enough. It seemed the right time to publicly say thank you to a tremendous team of people supporting this local author.

Learning Something New Every Day

Being Secretary of the Maryland Horse Council is not always that secretarial. Take for instance, this past weekend’s Maryland Horse Council Annual Barbeque, when I had the opportunity to play polo on the Maryland Horse Council Executive Committee’s team.

Valerie Ormond (left), Grace Fulton (center), and Jaime Navarro (right). Photo by Sue O'Donnell.

Valerie Ormond (left), Grace Fulton (center), and Jaime Navarro (right). Photos and videos by Sue O’Donnell.

[Read more…]

Inspirational Young Horse Saver

I reconnected with a childhood friend recently whose daughter, Nicole, volunteers with Freedom Hill Horse Rescue. My friend mentioned Nicole was preparing her end-of-year book report and diorama on my book, “Believing In Horses.” When I saw her diorama and read her report, I found it so touching that I wanted to share them with others. In times when children are often criticized for being self-centered and lazy, I’m happy to highlight one who is not.

So, from my youngest contributor to this blog, I bring you 10-year-old Nicole Cavanaugh, an inspirational young horse saver.

Nicole Cavanaugh's diorama for Believing In Horses

In this scene from “Believing in Horses” Sadie is going to Freedom Hill Horse Rescue for the first time. Sadie is visiting Freedom Hill to sign up as a volunteer and to show them her presentation about the horses that need to be saved. She is hoping they will help her save the horses that are going to be auctioned. This is an important moment for Sadie because this is the first time she asks for help to achieve her goal. (Nicole Cavanaugh)

Summary

The Navarros are moving to Bowie, Maryland, because Sadie’s Dad is in the military and is being reassigned for a few years. One of those years he will be in Afghanistan, which makes Sadie sad. Her reward for being so good about the situation is a horse. Sadie’s grandmother sends Sadie a horse. His name is Color Me Lucky but they call him Lucky. One day Sadie learned about 10 horses that needed to be saved because they were going to auction. Many horses that go to auction are killed for meat. Sadie decided she [Read more…]

Fun With Freedom U.S.A. Tour

 

Billy meets Freedom at Loftmar Stables, Bowie, Md.

Sometimes we just have to have fun. Last week, all the way from Vancouver, Canada, Freedom the “Spokes-character” for Voice For The Horse Foundation Children’s International Writing Competition made his first U.S. stop in Bowie, Md. I’ve been fortunate to work as a volunteer helping coordinate the Voice For The Horse annual writing competition for the past three years and serving as a judge.

I had the honor of being the first to host Freedom Flat Stanley to help promote the horse-themed children’s writing competition. We began the tour at Loftmar Stables ,where our Maryland horses welcomed him. [Read more…]

Riding Invisible – Book Review

Riding Invisible
It’s been awhile since a book review, and since I found this particular book so interesting, I wanted to share “Riding Invisible” by Sandra Alonzo with you.

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I loved “Riding Invisible” and had a hard time putting it down. The story begins with young Yancy running away from home on his horse, Shy, and the journal of his adventure. [Read more…]

One-Liners

One of my virtual friends, Charlie Bray, began a new series featuring one-liners from novels.

http://theindietribe.wordpress.com/2013/04/09/10-one-liners-from-10-novels-collection-one/

I’m pleased to announce that Charlie chose a one-liner from “Believing In Horses” as one of the top ten in the first collection.

“Ten pairs of eyes in various stages of fear, desperation, and sadness, all watching Sadie, seemingly pleading for her to do something” [Read more…]