Leadership – General Colin Powell’s Rules

           I recently spoke to a class of graduating seniors at the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland about being a consultant. The instructor said, “It would be nice if you could speak for a few minutes on leadership, too.”

Besides sharing my personal thoughts, I relied on what has worked for me for years: General Colin Powell’s Rules. I first read them when they became popular when General Powell released his first book, My American Journey, in 1995. I understood them immediately and gained a greater understanding of them while reading his book. I posted them on or near my desk or workplace in every job I could and still have a copy on my desk today.

Why? I’ve never found a time where at least one of them has not applied to the situation I faced. Sometimes, more than one applies. They also serve as a powerful reminder of perspective, human nature, and decision making in so many ways. So here they are.

General Colin Powell’s Rules:

  1. It ain’t as bad as you think. It will look better in the morning.
  2. Get mad, then get over it.
  3. Avoid having your ego so close to your position that when your position falls, your ego goes with it.
  4. It can be done!
  5. Be careful what you choose. You may get it.
  6. Don’t let adverse facts stand in the way of a good decision.
  7. You can’t make someone else’s choices. You shouldn’t let someone else make yours.
  8. Check small things.
  9. Share Credit.
  10. Remain calm. Be kind.
  11. Have a vision. Be demanding.
  12. Don’t take counsel of your fears or naysayers.
  13. Perpetual optimism is a force multiplier.

I hope these may come in useful to you at some point, and thank you, General Powell, for sharing them with the rest of us.

Photo Credit: Photo illustration by Peggy Frierson

Veteran Writing Services Celebrates Five Years in Business!

Who would have known that the first scribblings of a horse book would turn into Veteran Writing Services, now a a successful company for five years?

As crazy as it sounds, I woke up one night in October 2009 with an idea for a book sparked by an idea from a friend. My supportive husband understood, and I went to the living room and took down notes until early in the morning for what became the outline of my first book, Believing In Horses. I also fortunately had former bosses [Read more…]

Carly Kade Creative


I had a chance to visit in person with Carly Kade during the American Horse Publications 2018 Conference, and I don’t think I know of anyone with a more appropriate business name than “Carly Kade Creative.” She does it all – writes, creates videos, does graphic design, takes photographs, and has amazing marketing talent.

I first met Carly virtually when I featured her post on book reviews, which then led me to learn more about her award-winning equine romance novels. Here is my review of her first book, In the Reins. [Read more…]

Creating and Managing Successful Internships

Maryland Horse Council Intern Holden Rafey interviewing Olympian Joe Fargis (photo courtesy of Holden Rafey)

I landed my first professional job at WJZ-TV in Baltimore, Md., after serving as an intern while a student at Towson University. At 21-years-old, I became the station’s assistant Public Relations Officer with real duties and responsibilities and had the opportunity to work with industry icons like Oprah Winfrey. I owe that job and experience to my supervisor during my internship, Joyce Kashima. [Read more…]

Military Writers – Julia Maki

As I head off to the Military Writers Society of America (MWSA) Conference, it seems a good time to recognize military writers.
On September 7, I have the privilege of joining award-winning authors Jack Woodville London and Don Helin to conduct the “Writing Your Story” one-day workshop at the Audie Murphy Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Center in San Antonio, Texas. [Read more…]

How to Save a Facebook Post

How do I save a Facebook post?

Did you know that you can save a post on Facebook so that you could return to it afterwards without having to search for it? Here’s how to save a post in Facebook (with thanks to Greg Robson for pointing this out and Dave Johnson for a note on the mobile app).

Why would I want to save a post on Facebook?

Read more….

Thank you to the LibroEditing, proofreading, editing, transcription, localisation blog for sharing this post!