Local Politics

I live in Maryland, where the State legislature formed in 1632 – yes, before the United States became a country.  In the early days, many of the statesmen were farmers, and thus it made sense for the legislature to meet during the months least hospitable to working the land, January through early April.  This same schedule exists today, and many Marylanders are not aware that their elected State representatives conduct all their legislative business in a 90-day session, the vast majority of them holding other full-time jobs during the entire year.

On Tuesday, Nov. 16, 2010, members of The Maryland Horse Council received a legislative tour of the State Capitol in Annapolis.   State Senator Edward R. Reilly, (R), District 33, Anne Arundel County, introduced himself as “Big Ed,” while shaking each of our hands and asking a little about us.  He brought us into his office, and spent over an hour explaining how a bill becomes a law in “The Free State.”  Using a horse bill passed this year, he stepped us through the process, injecting humor where appropriate, and allowed our youngest visitor, Grace (11), to sit in the Senator’s seat and act as Senator for the exercise.   Senator Reilly spoke about the power of each person’s voice, encouraged all to get to know their elected representatives and communicate with them, and then took us on a one-hour tour of the Capital.  [Read more…]

Character Development

When I complained about challenges in life, my dad used to tell me: “It’s good for you; it builds character.”  He would say it as if in jest, but I knew he meant it.

People’s interest in some of the characters in Believing In Horses, has surprised me.  Readers have asked:

  • “Who was that supposed to be?”
  • “Are these real people?
  •  “Is your book an autobiography?”
  •  “Is that me?” [Read more…]

Reflections

Last month, I had the opportunity to attend Part 1 training for the Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association (EAGALA).   According to EAGALA’s Vision Statement, “EAGALA is committed to setting the standard of professional excellence in how horses and humans work together to improve the quality of life and mental health of individuals, families, and groups worldwide.”  (For more detailed information, please see www.EAGALA.org).  Significant differences between the EAGALA Model and other equine therapies include the team approach (a mental health professional, an equine specialist, and the horse), and the fact that NO riding is involved.  When asked why EAGALA conducts equine therapy on the ground versus on horseback, one of the instructors replied, “You can’t see yourself in the mirror when you are sitting on it.” One of the reasons EAGALA uses horses in therapy and learning is because the organization believes horses mirror what they are seeing and the situations they are presented. [Read more…]