Inspirational Young Horse Saver

I reconnected with a childhood friend recently whose daughter, Nicole, volunteers with Freedom Hill Horse Rescue. My friend mentioned Nicole was preparing her end-of-year book report and diorama on my book, “Believing In Horses.” When I saw her diorama and read her report, I found it so touching that I wanted to share them with others. In times when children are often criticized for being self-centered and lazy, I’m happy to highlight one who is not.

So, from my youngest contributor to this blog, I bring you 10-year-old Nicole Cavanaugh, an inspirational young horse saver.

Nicole Cavanaugh's diorama for Believing In Horses

In this scene from “Believing in Horses” Sadie is going to Freedom Hill Horse Rescue for the first time. Sadie is visiting Freedom Hill to sign up as a volunteer and to show them her presentation about the horses that need to be saved. She is hoping they will help her save the horses that are going to be auctioned. This is an important moment for Sadie because this is the first time she asks for help to achieve her goal. (Nicole Cavanaugh)

Summary

The Navarros are moving to Bowie, Maryland, because Sadie’s Dad is in the military and is being reassigned for a few years. One of those years he will be in Afghanistan, which makes Sadie sad. Her reward for being so good about the situation is a horse. Sadie’s grandmother sends Sadie a horse. His name is Color Me Lucky but they call him Lucky. One day Sadie learned about 10 horses that needed to be saved because they were going to auction. Many horses that go to auction are killed for meat. Sadie decided she wanted to save these horses. She did some research and found Freedom Hill Horse Rescue and Thoroughbred Placement Resources (TPR). TPR specializes in helping people to be responsible in placing retired racehorses. Freedom Hill rescues any horse that is at risk and needs a home. Sadie put together a slide presentation and gave it to the people at Loftmar Stables, TPR, and Freedom Hill to try to convince them to help her save the horses. Through a lot of hard work and persuasiveness, Sadie was able to find homes for all 10 horses. Sadie was very proud of herself.

Opinion

I loved “Believing in Horses” by Valerie Ormond. I thought it was very impressive how Sadie set so many long-term goals and then worked so hard to achieve them. It was very difficult to find homes for all the horses, but she kept working at it and in the end her hard work paid off. I think this is a good book not only for kids who love horses (like me!) but also for kids who have parents in the military and have to learn to be without a parent for a long period of time.

This book was very special to me because it was set in Bowie, Maryland, and because I am a volunteer at Freedom Hill Horse Rescue. I could really relate to the book, and it helped me to feel very connected to Sadie as she worked through the challenges she faced. I highly recommend this book.

by Nicole Cavanaugh

Thank you, Nicole, for your thoughts and your hard work! Any other inspirational stories out there? If so, please share.

Working with a Small Publisher

I thought this was the single best article I’ve seen about working with a small publisher. I’ve published both my books with a small press, J.B. Max Publishing, out of Vancouver, BC. I agree with many of the points in the article by WritersDigest.com editor Brian Klems, but here are my top three:

1. A small press can take on projects that don’t conform to the mainstream commercial market.

2. A small press cares about the success of a book beyond its initial release. To quote: “It’s a marathon, not a sprint.”

3. Small press authors can expect to have a personal relationship with small presses, or as one small press publisher cites it, “Tender, loving care.”

Thank you, Writers Digest, for covering this subject. For the full article, please see the following:

http://www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/the-pros-and-cons-of-publishing-with-a-small-publisher?et_mid=670988&rid=240171765

 

 

The Synopsis and its Friends

This post sponsored by Grammarly. Use Grammarly’s plagiarism checker because you want to write right (Has anyone said that before? – No!)

© Chasbrutlag | Dreamstime Stock Photos & Stock Free Images

© Chasbrutlag | Dreamstime Stock Photos & Stock Free Image

When I am asked what my books are about, I try to respond with one sentence. That answer is not a synopsis, but what I would consider one of the synopsis’ “friends.” Books descriptions serve specific purposes. And just to make it easier, not everyone agrees on the rules. I’ve pulled together some thoughts and resources on what I consider the three most common forms of synopses.

Three Forms of Synopses [Read more...]

Words of Encouragement

Valerie Ormond Believing In HorsesI opened my LinkedIn messages last week and found a thoughtful, professional recommendation from a colleague about my Navy life, my writing, and Believing in Horses.

I have known this colleague, Joe, for over 20 years. He was one of my senior officers in the Navy. Joe is the kind of guy who asks how you are doing, waits to hear the answer, and truly cares what you have to say. He is a gentleman, a strategic thinker, and a prolific writer. He can be counted on as the guy in a room who will be the first one to stand up and ask a question during that awkward silence while a speaker is waiting for someone to do so. And Joe asks the hard questions everyone else in the audience wants to know the answers to also. I’ve always had great respect for Joe. [Read more...]

Doctor’s Advice – Give a Book

 

Author of "an Unlikely Goddess"

Author Mohanalakshmi Rajakumar

Today I’m happy to bring you award-winning author Mohana Rajakumar and her recent novel, “An Unlikely Goddess.” Dr. Rajakumar is a writer, educator, and scholar of literature. She earned her PhD from the University of Florida with a focus on gender and postcolonial theory.  She is the author of seven e-books, and believes “words can help us understand ourselves and others.”

About “An Unlikely Goddess:”

” Sita is the firstborn, but since she is a female child, her birth makes life difficult for her mother who is expected to produce a son. From the start, Sita finds herself in a culture hostile to her, but her irrepressible personality won’t be subdued. Born in India, she immigrates as a toddler to the U.S. with her parents after the birth of her much anticipated younger brother. Sita’s struggles to be American and yet herself, take us deeper into understanding the dilemmas of first generation children, and how religion and culture define women.” [Read more...]

Writing Resources for Veterans and Others

VWPI recently spent a fantastic weekend with the Veterans Writing Project. For those not familiar, the Veterans Writing Project is a non-profit based in Washington, DC, offering no-cost writing seminars and workshops for veterans, active and reserve service members, and military family members.

During the two-day seminar, I spoke up when I had information I thought may help others. I was going to send the list of websites and references I mentioned to the other seminar attendees, and thought – why not share it with others?

So here are some tips that came to my mind during this course, which I hope may be of some use to you. [Read more...]