Free Jumping – with Video!

American Quarter Horse Billy free jumping for the first time

Billy free jumping. For videos, see links in post.

My husband, Jaime Navarro, and I won a silent auction item at the recent Maryland Horse Council annual barbeque: 1 Free Jumping Session with Steuart Pittman. At Pittman’s Dodon Farm, he and an assistant school a horse through their jumping chute in the indoor arena. According to the auction flyer, “Most horses only need to do it once or twice for them and you to find out just how much talent they have.”

A life-long horseman, Steuart Pittman’s credentials include certification to teach eventing through the preliminary level. I featured him in Believing In Horses as “the current President of the MHC, a well-known local equestrian, and a former grassroots lobbyist,” all true. Dodon Farm’s business ranges from breeding, training, and starting horses to improving riders. I also consider Steuart a “horse saver” (my term), for his tremendous efforts in supporting the MHC’s Unwanted Horse Project and in his work retraining off-track Thoroughbreds. He and his wife, Erin, created The Retired Racehorse Training Project, which recently received its official 501(c)3 charitable status. [Read more…]

A Portion of the Proceeds to Help Thoroughbreds

Thoroughbred Placement and Rescue, Inc. Booth at Maryland Million

Lucy Krone (left), on the Board of Directors for Thoroughbred Placement and Rescue, Inc., received check from Valerie Ormond (right) as a portion of the proceeds from Beliveing In Horses.

The highlight of my weekend came on Saturday when I provided one of the Maryland rescues featured in Believing In Horses with a small donation. When I decided to write a book about unwanted horses, I knew I wanted to include real life rescues and retraining facilities. I’d met Kimberly Clark, owner and founder of Thoroughbred Placement and Rescue, Inc. (TPR, Inc.) once, and knew she was the type person, and ran the kind of facility, I wanted to accurately portray in the story. Besides bringing awareness to the unwanted horse problem, I had also hoped to recognize the efforts of hard-working volunteers and provide a portion of the book proceeds to two Maryland horse rescue organizations (Freedom Hill Horse Rescue is the other, and they’ll be receiving a check during their Oct. 22nd fundraiser).

When I found out that TPR, Inc. would have a booth at the Maryland Million horse race, I thought it would be a great opportunity to present them a check on that day. I hadn’t expected to be able to provide a donation this soon, since the book has only been out for a few months, but people have been so generous. It’s funny, the book sells for $12.67 with Maryland tax, and at one point I started saying, ‘Or $13.00 even if you want me to donate that extra 33 cents directly to the rescues.’ It’s amazing how many people want to donate that change, and how some have even tacked on a few extra dollars. [Read more…]

What I Did on My Summer Vacation

Virginia Brownie Troop Believing In Horses visit, Fair Hill, Horses on Trailer, Jaime and baby

Fun summer with book signings, trail rides, work, family fun, and more.

As people are going back to school, it seemed a good time to think back on what I did on my summer vacation. Now, this will be the first time I’ve actually had to write one of these, because although I’ve heard of the assignment for years, I don’t remember ever having to do it. There’s no time like the present!
-Stopped blogging for two months. Surprisingly, I thought so few people read my blogs, until I stopped writing and people asked me what happened. So I guess I can chalk that one up to “research.”
-Attended my first American Horse Publications conference. Great fun, good people, and learned a lot. Professional development.
-Showed Lucky Western in the Southern Maryland Horse Show Association. Highlight: judge told me he needs to in the English ring because he moves so good. Proud horse mom.
-Some firsts on trail rides: first time we had all three of our horses out together, and first time for a bed and breakfast overnighter with horses (Fairwinds Farm and Stable). Love that trailer.
-Presentations/book signings at Loftmar Stables, West River Summer Camp, to the best-behaved Brownie troop ever from Virginia, and to the South County Senior Center. All good.
-Chaired the Prince George’s County Equine Industry Task Force’s Subcommittee on Unwanted Horses and Ethical Treatment of Equines. Hope to educate/inform the community on issues. [Read more…]

Measuring Success

How do you measure success as a writer?

Novel Publicity posed this as one of its author Facebook page questions last week.  I’ve considered this question regularly, and need to come back to it when I get off track.  I SHOULD develop a writing mantra along the lines of “Success equals creating something meaningful.”  Okay, need to work on the mantra, but I think you get my point.

Forces must have realized I needed to think about it, as I came across Charlotte Carter’s blog entry, Win Vs. Compete.  Her final question:  “Where do you fit on the competitiveness scale?” I’m very proud of my military background and heritage.  However, spending 25-years in competitive organizations among extremely competitive people drove a competitive edge into me that I don’t think was there by nature.  And now, as a writer, it’s time to focus on what I want as part of the process and in the end, not what someone else has defined for me as success. [Read more…]

Fun First Events

Since the official release of Believing In Horses on March 21st, I discovered that book events are fun.  My clever and talented brother developed a talk show format for presentations in schools, “Books Alive with Reed Moore,” which gets kids participating and interested in the subject.  Reed Moore (also known as the Believing In Horses EdUCator) made the kids laugh, think, and unable to wait to ask questions.  Even those who appeared disinterested at first couldn’t help but be motivated by Reed Moore’s energy!  Tremendous audiences at Harmony Hills Elementary School, Silver Spring, MD, and Tracey’s Elementary School, Tracy’s Landing, MD, read aloud, played along with the activities, and asked thoughtful questions.  Parents and teachers groaned at some of the campy jokes, but something in common happened across the rooms no matter the age:  sparks.

Eddy Ormond and Valerie Ormond at Books Alive with Reed Moore

Eddy Ormond (left) and Valerie Ormond speak to students at Tracey’s Elementary School as part of the “Books Alive with Reed Moore” Tour.

Author Kathi Appelt, mentioned in my last blog, recommends writing like your fingers are “on fire.”  Author Valerie Sherwood encourages writing about what genuinely interests you so words “catch fire” with readers.  I’m sure if I searched, I’d find many other fiery writing quotes, but I think you get the point.  However, I discovered it is one thing to hear and read others’ advice, and quite another to see that sparkle in people’s eyes in person when a book comes alive.  [Read more…]

Just Add Magic

 

 

Just Add Magic

Abracadabra–it’s official:  I AM a writer.  I learned this, among other things, while attending my first all-day writing conference, the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators Maryland/Delaware/West Virginia Region Spring Conference.  Over 190 attendees included beginner and experienced writers, illustrators, editors, agents, and more.  Fortunately, I had the opportunity to make some new acquaintances, including Cindy Callaghan, author of Just Add Magic, which seemed an appropriate image for this blog, for reasons you’ll understand if you read to the end (not fair, I know!).

Since I don’t think anyone wants to hear my play-by-play description of the conference, I’m going to report a short takeaway from each speaker I saw.  (Due to breakout sessions, I could not see/hear all speakers).  My highlights may not be the same as someone else’s, but that’s part of the beauty of conferences – the ability to listen for the messages applicable to you. [Read more…]